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america so told a lie to get us in but it did not work. it took pearl harbor. >> host: went to world leaders get behind closed doors to they like to each other? >> the main reason is there is not a great deal of trust to begin with when the two leaders get behind closed doors. states cannot trust each other very much and reagan hit the nail on the head when he said trust but verify. he said you have to verify they are telling the truth. separate it would be the highly unusual circumstance where one leader is in a position where he or she can bamboozle another leader. you don't see much of that. you see some but not much. >> when you see a president having a special relationship with another world leader does that tell you anything about the truth level? >> if it is usually a function of strategic factors. franklin d. roosevelt had a special relationship of four. and that was very intense the year before pearl harbor because he wanted the united states to be involved very much and fdr wanted to get us into the war so they worked hand in hand to do everything they could to get the unit
orders to the united states, and it was in pearl harbor we were stationed. so i first set foot in america in pearl harbor. and so i arrive inside the navy housing at pearl harbor, the daughter of an enlisted serviceman who was a valet. that's what you wanted if you were a filipino, to be a valet or steward in the homes of the admiral, and i began my american journey. here i am on my fifth birthday with my other class mates there, the girls in the neighborhood and my little brother who's rather confused where he fits in, but he found his way. [laughter] so that really began my ethnic journey. one of the things i struggled with was trying to fit in. your height, your size, your color, et, et, don't set the stereotype of what's typically american. you constantly struggle to find a place where you really fit in. i learned to resolve this by saying, you know, it's not so bad being the underdog. first of all, you know, you look different, people remember you, right? and you're also hungry for opportunities because you want to move out of your condition. you don't want to be poor again. you don'
, like pearl harbor in hawaii and fort hood in texas. >> when we're all done, we're going to have somewhere between 10,000 and 30,000 stitchers. >> reporter: anyone can line up and take a turn. each stitch, as individual as people who make them. >> shepard smith reporting. once fully restored, the flag will become part of the permanent collection at the 911 memorial museum which is under construction at ground zero. >>> a major food chain going green, and how much alcohol is too much before getting behind the wheel. shawn yancy shawn yancy back with your fox top 5. >>> up first tonight, mcdonald's new plan for french fry grease. number 5, the chain is going green in the united arab of emirates. they are trying to use its left over vegetable oil and will convert it into bio diesel fuel. >>> number 4, buying gold is as simple as buying candy from a vending machine. check it out. it is called gold to go. stick in your cash and out pops your gold. 50 of these machines are being installed in britain. it's a way for everyday people to invest in the precious metal. >>> would you like a l
political event in his or her life. >> that is fascinating. elaborate on that a little bit. >> as pearl harbor was for an earlier generation, i know that students that i teach at washington college -- this was a visceral image of -- in their young lives, one that they will carry with them forever. >> it is not necessarily something that they think about every single day, but the event has had such a dramatic impact on them? >> i think that is right. i think it does reservist from time to time -- resurface from time to time. i do think we now have a context to empathize with other victims. >> with terrorism -- taliban, al-qaeda -- they are synonymous in our minds? >> al qaeda it is terror group number one, but it is broader than that. there are terrorists all over the world. most people believe that terrorist -- there will be more terrorist groups in the future. >> that is kind of frightening. we never knew suicide bombers and things like that. now, all of a sudden, they will show up in countries all over the world, throw bombs, ied's. >> this form of terrorism was started in tamil. >> w
really guided our policy in the far east right up until pearl harbor. so he really introduced america to foreign affairs and provided commitments for us. >> jon: that's the nicest way i've ever heard that put. he introduced us to foreign affairs and commitments, commitments we still enjoy today. [laughter] "the president and the assassin" on the bookshelves now. scott miller, thank you so much. [cheering and applause] >> jon: that's our show. join us next week at 11:00. so there you have it. finally. stop with the letters and the cards and the e-mails. we had the mckinley guy on. done. [cheering and applause] here it is, your moment of zen. >> honest to god, my favorite no peanut butter. stracaptioning sponsored by comedy central
-door policy, which really guided our policy in the far east right up until pearl harbor. so he really introduced america to foreign affairs and provided commitments for us. >> jon: that's the nicest way i've ever heard that put. he introduced us to foreign affairs and commitments, commitments we still enjoy today. [laughter] "the president and the assassin" on the bookshelves now. on the bookshelves now. scott miller, thank you so much. : could switching to geico really save you 15% or more on car insurance? host: do people use smartphones to do dumb things? man 1: send, that is the weekend. app grapgic: yeah dawg! man 2: allow me to crack...the bubbly! man 1: don't mind if i doozy. man 3: is a gentleman with a brostache invited over to this party? man 1: only if he's ready to rock! ♪ sfx: guitar and trumpet jam vo: geico. 15 minutes could save you 15% or more on car insurance. >> jon: that's our show. join us next week at 11:00. so there you have it. finally. stop with the letters and the cards and the e-mails. we had the mckinley guy on. done. [cheering and applause] here it is, y
. it took pearl harbor to get us into the war. >> professor when the world leaders get behind closed doors to the lie to each other? >> hardly ever and the main reason is that there's not a great deal of trust to begin with went to world leaders get behind closed doors. states tend not to trust each other very much. ronald reagan really hit the nail on the head when he said trust but verify. he said you really can't trust people you have to verify that they are telling the truth. so, it's really going to be a highly unusual circumstance where one leader is in a position where he or she can bamboozle another leader. so you just don't see much of that kind of lie. you see some for sure but not much. >> when you see a president having a special relationship with another world leader does that tell you anything about their truest level? >> i think it usually is a function of strategic factors. winston churchill and franklin d. roosevelt had a special relationship before and that relationship was very intense in the year before pearl harbor because winston churchill wanted the united states to
be outraged. gettysburg doesn't charge to get and neither does pearl harbor and i think they shouldn't charge down at pearl harbor. >> you bring up a really good point. if they're complaining they don't have enough money to fund this thing throughout the year, first, why did they decide to make it so big, but sec, those salaries! i was stunned when i looked at those. and there's a number of them, about ten of them, i believe, those salaries put them into the top 1% of earners in america. i mean, that's how rich these salaries are. were you surprised by what they're planning on paying people? >> yeah, they say they're doing a great job and they deserve it, but it's ridiculous. you have 14 million people unemployed, more underemployed and they're claiming their salaries are justified. it's not justified. they're making money off people that died that day, the most tragic day in american history, and they haven't listened to the families or anybody else with this museum pip mean, we don't even have the ranks of the firefighters on the memorial and their ages. it's not on there like pearl harbor.
along lee highway and i-66. >>> an archaeology crew made a major discovery at the bottom of pearl harbor. it unearthed a skull believed to belonged to have a japanese pilot who died in the historic attack on december 7th, 1941. if it is confirmed, the skull would be the first japanese remains found at the site since world war ii. 55 japanese airmen were killed and 29 of their aircraft shot down that day. 2400 u.s. service members were also killed in the surprise attack. >>> the time is 4:37. at 4:41, mayor vincent gray is boarding a plane to hollywood today. >> at 4:52, even more changes coming to your neighborhood post office. we'll tell you about them. >> we're back with your weather first in two minutes. fiber makes me sad. oh common. i dare you to taste one hint of fiber in fiber one. oh, i'd be able to tell. why don't i just eat this bag? and how can you talk to me about fiber when you are eating a candybar. you enjoy that. i am. [ male announcer ] fiber beyond recognition. fiber one. >>> howard here with your weather first on this very hot thursday. we're looking at temperatures wh
of causes that i would hope -- [inaudible] >> and he became come his pacifism was defended after pearl harbor.(z >> i mean, sort of thought it was a moot point at that point. it's sort of a different situation. he had seen too much of kind of ugly leaders, not just here, fascism in this country. and he worried that in light of the great depression, in light of some of the things he saw that war in this country would lead to fascism here. i mean coming we sort of hear that and can't believe, this is the greatest generation. fascism would never occur here. but he worried about that. >> now, the one story i grew up knowing about norman thomas isg probably a pocketful, but involves conversation with franklin roosevelt. you want to tell the story?xw[? >> sure.[ó[ó[w[w >> you knew this was coming. >> i knew this was coming.[ó[ó[ so, one of norman's causes in[ów the 1930s was he was working on behalf of sharecroppers inóxw the south who were being[[ó[w murdered, lynched, and[ó[ó unbelievable things are happening to[w them. they couldn't meet in groups. there were drive-by shooting
to --.net. >> and he became, his pacifism was defended after pearl harbor. >> yeah. i mean, sort of a moot point at that point. the 1930s a sort of a(r different situation. he had seen too much of some kind of ugly leaders. not just year, not is an and in this country. and he worried that and lot of the great depression, in light of some of his things he saw, that were in this country would lead to fascism here. i mean, we sort of hear that and can't believe that, you know, this is the greatest generation. fascism would never exist year. but he worried about that. >> now, the one story i grew up knowing about norma's thomas isw probably apocryphal, that involved a conversation with franklin roosevelt. do you want to tell that story?ó >> scheuer.[x[w[ó >> you knew this was coming.[ó >> i knew this was[ó coming.[ó[ so, one of norman's causes in[w the 1930s was he was working[ó on behalf of sharecroppers inóxw the south who are being[ó murdered, lynched, and just[]xó unbelievable things were happening to them. laws were being passed saying you couldn't meet. there were drive-by sho
the united states had better get ready. it was silly to be massing our ships at pearl harbor and when world war ii was over the communists would be in charge of china. greco turkish war was a little aftermath of world war i at the italian campaign in ethiopia, astonishing. >> and the rise of the cold war. >> he's of a rise of the cold war. he did not write about that directly. i think he wrote about it in directly in the old man and the sea. a wonderful lyrical exploration of nature that hemingway's rating -- the fallout drifting down on washington d.c. from -- people are building bomb shelters. in his own way it is a plea for a more primitive and simple life. >> brings us to contemporary times when people are thinking about shelters and catastrophe from afar. the poster for old man in the sea in 1951 and nobel prize in 1954. fifteen of his novels are the greatest novel of the century made into movies. 21 books altogether though we were trying to count them up before. it gets a little dicey because as many as ten were published after his death. let's take the next telephone call from north
now. >> the former cia director told lawmakers the next pearl harbor will likely be a cyber attack. in some cases thousands of times every day government computer are being hacked and the primary culprit is china. >> we have been attacked during my opening statement thousands of time. because one doesn't appear to to be as big as pearl harbor doesn't change the fact that sooner or later america will have to respond in a more aggressive faction to some and be prepared offensively for others. >> reporter: recently the obama administration said loss of a electrical grid or communication network would undermine public confidence and in some cases create panic. >> the critical infrastructure element attached to the networks can become vulnerable to sciesh attacks. this is not conjecture. it's reality. hackers froab critical infrastructure companies on a daily business. >> reporter: these are now seen with greater frequency. they are often state sponsored. and to embed and operate under the radar so they can consistently steal information from that network. martha: mother nature has her
pearl harbor. we had no army. half our navy had been destroyed. the germans were nearly to moscow. britain was about finished and churchill came across the atlantic and gave a speech and he said, we haven't gone this far because we're made of sugar candy. that's the message we need now. >> that's the kind of historical perspective we all need. david mccullough, thank you very much. we will be right back. the chevy cruze eco offers an epa estimated 42 miles per gallon on the highway. how does it do that? well, to get there, a lot of complicated engineering goes into every one. like variable valve timing and turbocharging, active front grille shutters that close at high speeds, and friction reducing -- oh, man, that is complicated. how about this -- cruze eco offers 42 miles per gallon. cool? ♪ [ male announcer ] an everyday moment can turn romantic anytime. and when it does, men with erectile dysfunction can be more confident in their ability to be ready with cialis for daily use. ♪ cialis for daily use is a clinically proven low-dose tablet you take every day so you can be rea
pearl harbor? >> i loved pour key's. >> let's welcome our guests. she has more charm than a harry potter spell book. i am here with the social media strategist. nice little waive. and he is so funny that all of his gas is laughing gas. his comedy central album is available on i tunes and amazon. and when he hears black tie he thinks of the heroin. it is bill shultz. and she is so sharp that sushi chefs use her to is slice shashimi. and sitting next to me is casey mcfarland. and he is an angry cramugeon. good to see you, pinch. >> he analyzes a ballgame as a, quote, purely arold experience. i recall babe ruth having such an experience immediately following a day game. did i say arold? i mean oral. geeing? >> thank you. >> this is new. i don't know. the technology is ceaseless. >> for an e-mail with zest, just look to the west. yep, on tuesday, a day of the week, congresswoman debbie waser man shultz talked about the cut, cap and balance legislation. and get this, she is not a fan. no,. >> president obama promised to veto this bill that ends the medicare guarantee and incredited due losly,
secretary leon panetta warned america's next pearl harbor could come over the internet. jennifer griffin with the news live at the pentagon tonight. and, jennifer, what do we know so far about what they got in this attack. >> well, harris, the revelation came during a speech outlining the new pentagon cyber strategy deputy defense secretary william lind dropped this bombshell that in march the pentagon had experienced one of its largest cyber thefts ever. >> this was significant and it was a defense contractor. it was data-related to systems that are being developed for the department of defense. it was large, 24 hours files. it was done, we think, by a foreign intelligence service. nation state was behind it. >> there are an estimated 60,000 probes involving malicious software program trying to break into pentagon systems every day we're told. >> harris: jennifer, do you have any idea specifically which foreign government may have done it? >> secretary lynn would not name names although he added that the peck has a good idea which foreign government the cyber attack emanated from. he wa
. these were terrible times. i think maybe the darkest time was right after pearl harbor. we had no army. half the navy was destroyed. britain was about finished. and churchill came across the atlantic and gave a speech and said we haven't gone this far because we're made of sugar candy. that's the message we need now. >> and that's the kind of historical perspective we all need. thank you very much. we will be right back. somewhere in america, there's a doctor who can peer into the future. there's a nurse who can access in an instant every patient's past. and because the whole hospital's working together, there's a family who can breathe easy, right now. somewhere in america, we've already answered some of the nation's toughest healthcare questions. and the over 60,000 people of siemens are ready to do it again. siemens. answers. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] more people are leaving bmw, mercedes and lexus for audi than ever before. experience the summer of audi event and get over 130 channels of siriusxm satellite radio for 3 months at no charge. welcome. i understand you need a little help
to both as an issue. >> his pacifism was suspended after pearl harbor. she had seen too much not for the fascism in this country and he worried that in light of the great depression and in light of what they saw the country would lead to the fascism here. we can't believe that it's the greatest generation. you know. >> there was a lot of fear. >> the one story i grew up knowing about norman thomas is partly apocryphal but involved in conversation with franklin roosevelt, you want to tell the story?[[ó[ó >> one of norman's causes in thó 1930's he was working on behalfw sharecroppers in the self being murdered and other things are happening to them and there were drive-by shootings and unbelievable situations and when they try to unionize it got much, much worse and by the men carrying shotguns and you've got to do something, you've got to do something, and he goes and says you've got to do something this is just unconscionable. and he says you know what, norman, i'm a better politician than you are. nine of these people and they're doing good work done there and it's just
the decision to declare war against america on the 11th of december, 1941, four days after pearl harbor -- something that they did not need to do because they had no contractual treaty obligations to do this -- once again you see ideology playing a massive part. the only nazi leader, significant leader who'd ever been to america, the foreign secretary, had spent four years here trying unsuccessfully to sell champagne in the 1920s. [laughter] and that was, nevertheless, considered by the rest of the nazis who hadn't been here to mean that he was a great expert. and he said that because america was run by jews and by african-americans, therefore, they couldn't possibly get together an army that would land in western europe until the year 1970. he, obviously, by the way, hadn't looked very carefully at the actual makeup of the roosevelt administration. [laughter] and this is what, this is what he said. this is what he told a delegation of italians in 1942 about the americans. he said this: i know them, i know their country. a country devoid of culture, devoid of music. above all, a country
roosevelt start of world war ii by selecting the japanese to bomb pearl harbor and that got us into world war ii. but i think lincoln was aware that i send the ship, he was aware of everything. he had sent spies to charleston. security was in that tight. so we knew by sending the ships that pretty much they were going to fire. so i think lincoln put jefferson davis in the top spot. if jefferson davis didn't fire and he resupplied afford and threw in more men, what does that show to france and great britain that the confederacy couldn't defend afford in the second most populous city in the confederacy? so davis felt that he had to do it. and i think lincoln -- i think lincoln may have hoped that there would be no more. after all, if he sent an end and there was no war, that would have suited him to. okay? he wasn't interested in starting the war. if it was going to start he wanted to start it in a way that would rally the union, which it did. when he did that by design and whether he bumbled into it is a debate that historians are still debating. yes, sir. >> i've heard explanations about
for strategic disbursal. i recognize that concept. there have been photographs of pearl harbor with carrier row, battleship row and ships bunched together and how the japanese aircraft were table to knock them out in 1941. and there was justification for the navy's concept of dispersal during the cold war. but even then, many critics from g.a.o. were faulting the navy at a time when i was in the pentagon for lack of a focused threat assessment to justify what some people were calling strategic home poring, putting them -- poring -- porking. today's threats are entirely different. i would make the ironic note that tkeus bursal has occurred through reduction. the united states navy today is one half the size it was when i was secretary of navy when we had 568 combatants. a certain amount of disbursal has occurred by the dwindling size of the navy. the second point is a convention type of pearl harbor is unlikely to happen. secretary panetta mentioned in june the next pearl harbor we could confront would be a cyberattack that cripples our financial systems and our governmental systems. i do not mi
pearl harbor, something they didn't need to do because they had no treaty obligations to do this, once again you see ideology playing a massive part. the only nazi heard, significant leader who had ever been to america, the foreign secretary, had spent four years here trying unsuccessfully to sell champaigne in the 1920s. that was nevertheless by the rest of the nazis who had never been here to be a great expert. he said because america was run by jews and by african americans, therefore, they couldn't possibly get together an army to land in western europe until the 1970s. he obviously did not look carefully at the makeup of the roosevelt administration. [laughter] this is what -- this is what he said -- this is what he told the delegation of battalions in 1942 about the americans. he said this, "i know the country, a country devoid of culture, music, above all, a country without soldiers, a people who will never decide the war from the air. a jewish nation like that ever become a race of fighters and fighting aces?" the fact was needless to say we landed a quarter of a million men in
ledge. -- coolidge. but my brother was in the movie "pearl harbor" and i just saw it the other night. there was a lot of animosity toward japanese-americans. it is true. >> the one thing i don't like about the woman in the petition is that she assumes that we don't understand that it is bigoted. it is just like, oh, she has to take it -- >> that's what all sensors say. they are like, i know better. these people don't get it. they can't think for themselves, so i have to edit it for them. from you offended by something, you don't participate. she has a right to do this partition. well, the city better not respond to this. no matter how many signatures it gets -- >> isn't it in a park? >> first, if you don't like it, don't take your kids to the damn thing. it is not like it is on television, right? >> no. >> why are we talking about this? >> they do show the movie on tv. >> they do? >> yeah. >> i am told glen beck is not going to go. >> just because something hurts your feelings doesn't mean you can can sell it out of existence. >> i'm sorry. i forgot we were on fox. >> to the greg-alo
by tragedy like pearl harbor in hawaii and fort hood, texas. >> we will have twine 20,000 and 30,000 stitchs. >> veterans and other local heros getting first dibs. but any one can line up and take a turn. each stitch as individual as the person who maked them. >> i apologized to them because now my tears are on the flag. >> catherine cross cried as she made a stitch in monitoringer >> i recognize the sacrifice of my son and all of the others we lost in service to our country. >> every time i hear the star spangled banner, gave proof through the night that our flag was there still, it's still here and to me is getting more beautiful every day. >> the flag is in north carolina. 15 more states to go along with the district of columbia abefore the remembrance of the attacks of 9/11. wunls completed tle b t will ba part of the permanent collection at the museum. to see the complete series visit our website at fox news .com/freedom. >>> the four astronauts who will fly the last ever scheduled space shuttle mission have arrived in florida. the astronauts made the customary flight from houston to th
. >> with respect to the ben aflack disaster a couple of years ago the quintquintessential telling of pearl harbor. the movie on which the tv series was based mash is my no. 9 pick, it told the story of a group of renegade doctors during the korean conflict with strong sentiments about the company and its policies. and number eight was tom cruise as first academy award nomination, 1999 born on the fourth of july a true story of a vietnam veteran. itsour no. 6 pick is also a military story bill murray strike is one whose bill murray's are reverences' the strike to the solute in know what you're talking a mile denzel washington won his first oscar as he should have, no. 5 on my red white and blue 10. the most controversial on my list will be michael moore's bowling for, but columbine more would argue that this sense is what created america. its bill buster fever, jimmy stewart's 1939 classic mr. smith goes to washington and no. 3 pick. we see gov in action. and number two it is a saving private ryan, tom hanks and steven spielberg disturbing depiction of the real horrors of war saluting the men an
reason. it is not as if we can say we are defending our shores. this is not pearl harbor. so, why is it my students, to whom i am very detached, are people in this thing, why should they have to be in the military if not for the sugar palm of people think in them in airport -- because that is not going to happen. this was derived in part from my last book -- "bridging the military-civilian divide." that is really the issue here. the fact that the military at this point is a very small portion of our society. less than 1% of people are currently in uniform. they increasingly feel that as civilians just don't care. my goal is to give the military -- first of all, to give the military base sense of its own worth that is not dependent on the wind, the cold winds, the warmer winds, of hugging and airports or public approbation. host: here are the numbers to call if you would like to join. and we do have a lineup before active members -- the number four active members of the military, 737-2579. you have been at enable -- naval academy for 24 years. what did you hear from the incoming cl
'd been a young reporter and was very first on the scene after the pearl harbor attack. she was recruited by the os as because of a working knowledge of japanese and their wartime experience. she and julie would disappear. she and jane would disappear for weeks at a time on orientation courses and small arms courses where they learn how to master a thompson submachine gun and a colt 45. julia was desperate to go to france or but after 17 years of high school and college french she discovered she couldn't speak a word. she had no special skills to recommend her for overseas service. so when the word went out that donovan was looking for warm bodies, any bodies, to help set up and run network of new intelligence bases in india, burma and china, she immediately volunteered. she didn't care where she went as long as she got to go. there was a man shortage and the newly formed oss was woefully understaffed. it's important i think to remember that when you think of the oss, you generally think about the paramilitary and guerrilla operations. they get all the glory. you think of grainy images of
've heard these conspiracy theorists saying that fdr invited the japanese attack on pearl harbor, or someone was secretly behind the attacks on 9/11. but i really do think that lincoln was sort of thinking several chest moves ahead of jefferson davis in this situation, and may even with that sort of masterstroke -- masterstroke, i was a winning the war but keeping the confederacy from winning the war, the crucial moment. so my lincoln is a lincoln who goes from this sort of uncertain and in some ways bubbling guy to i think biden the end of my book, a few months into his presidency, becoming well on his way to the great leader, a great president that we think of today. >> and was -- unfair question, was it union or slavery? >> i think for lincoln, union and slavery were sort of inseparable causes. because the reason that the south was seceding was because of slavery, and it was because of his stand that northerners were taking where they were willing to yield no further to what they called the slave power. and this result had been decreed by the outcome of the national election, the election
. when a close friend ofhe sullivan family died at pearl harbor, the solo event five brothers and listed in the u.s. navy. but under the condition that they would be allowed to serve together. one of the brothers wrote -- we will make a team together but cannot be beat. born and raised here in waterloo, the five sullivan brothers have always stuck together. however, one cold morning after a long night of intense battles, a japanese torpedo struck the ship upon which they served. it killed most of the crew, and it launched the rest into the water. the oldest of the sullivan brothers was named george. george tirelessly searched the waters for his brothers, but there were not to be found. george survived the attack. but later, george perished at sea. of the 697 brave man of that ship, only 10 survived that attack. the rest gave their lives for their country. and in spite of the intense pain of losing five sons all at once, the parents of the sullivans' became an inspiration to the rest of the nation. in the midst of their grief, they spoke to millions of americans behal of the war effort.
congressional testimony the former cia director leanne panetta told lawmakers the next pearl harbor will likely be a cyber attack, the difference is u.s. government systems are being probed routinely, in some cases, thousands of times every day, and the primary culprit is china. >> we as a nation have already been attacked during my opening statement, thousands of times. attacks go on every day. and because one doesn't appear to be as large as pearl harbor doesn't change the fact that sooner or later, america will have to respond in a more aggressive fashion to some and be better prepared defensively for others. >> reporter: advanced per system threats are seen with a greater frequency, they are often state sponsored an an effort to breach a government computer systems and operate under the radar to continue stealing valuable information. jon: who's getting targeted the most? >> reporter: it's not just government computer systems that are vulnerable but the obama administration said critical infrastructure is the target because the loss of an letting grid or communication network would undermin
at pearl harbor and when world war ii was over, the communists would be in charge in china. he interviewed someone in a cave. the grec o-turkish war, ethiopia. >> he also saw the rise of the cold war in the united states. >> he did. he also saw the rise of the cold war in the united states. did he not write about that directly. i think he wrote about it very indirectly in "the old man and the sea." it's just a wonderf wonderful, lyrical exploration of nature that hemmingway's writing as the atomic fallout is drifting down in washington d.c. and oak park, illinois and people are making bombshell teres. i think in his own way, it's a plea for a more primitive and more simple life. >> and brings us, really, to contemporary times when people are thinking about shell ters from trouble afar. he won the pulitzer in 1953 and the nobel prize the year after. 15 novels were made into movies and 21 books altogether, although we were trying to count them up before. it gets a little dicey. as many as 10 were published after his death in 1961. let's take our next call from ashville, north carolina, talk
by secretary of defense leon panetta who noted in recent testimony that the next pearl harbor we confront could very well be a cyberattack that cripples our power systems, our grid, our security systems, our financial systems, our governmental systems. it's no secret that the internet has become a critical component of our day to day lives. every day across the globe over two billion users get online to shop, do business, connect with friends and family and a host of other activities. cybersecurity affects clearly our national defense, all of our businesses, our schools, our seniors, in effect all of us. indeed while the internet has become one of our strongest capabilities it has also emerged as a stunning vulnerability. we need only to look at recent cyberattacks on sony, lock heed martin and other enterprises to witness the combrord damage that can be caused from anywhere in the world. at relatively little cost to those that care he out these actions. hackers become more sophisticated by the hour. an attack could cripple fort drum, could cripple our national security, could cripple the elect
've seen in the past. except for pearl harbor. so to me it was a place you could make a difference in terms of the national security of the united states and in terms of protecting your community and moving it forward. as you know, we also had some of the economic challenges. it still confronts to us this is the place where you can make a difference. >> why are so many members of the house running for president? and not one sitting u.s. senator? >> there's three of us. you have to ask the senate. i don't know. usually it is the senate that winds up doing it. so i'm not sure. i know there are a lot of people that have passed on this, not just in the senate. i think in many ways it shows a healthy respect for the political ability of the president. no one is under any illusions as to the fact that he is a very spirited campaigner, has been very successful, and has had a rapid assent to the oval office. for republicans, i think a lot of them were look at it in terms of being a difficult race and had also declined on the basis of their family, which is understandable. to me it's their decision
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